some people can't resist the "get a real job" line

Get a real job.

My mother said to me yesterday that a real job is when someone owns a real business and they pay you a real paycheck to do real work for them.

So in my mother's mind, you have to be directed by somebody else to do what somebody else dreamed up, to have a real job.

What I have is a self-directed make-it-up-as-I-go sort of job.

My job requires a lot of follow through and follow up and diligence and competence.

And other people have succeeded in supporting themselves at this job, so I have a blueprint.

And it is a real job that requires daily effort that takes many hours.

But because it's entrepreneurial, I have to invest everything I've got before I start being able to pay myself.

And in the meantime, failure is part of success, and a bankruptcy is not unheard of in the trajectory of an entrepreneur's dream coming true.

 

Yesterday, on top of my mother saying that, I heard that a friend of one of my children told my adult child that they need to make enough money to be able to support me.

I asked the adult child of mine where this person got the idea that I couldn't support myself.

The adult child answered that the person reads my blog and knows about my bankruptcy.

Oh.

Wow.

The person reads this blog and what the person decided is that they should advise my grown children to start making more money because they're going to need to support me.

I never guessed that anyone would come away from my writings with that idea.

 

Here's the idea I want people to come away with from my writings:

 

At any age and with whatever talent, a person can decide to pursue what she loves at all cost.

She can do whatever needs to be done, clear the path to her destiny in whatever way is necessary, as long as she doesn't hurt anyone.

If others find value and inspiration in her determination and in her art, all the better.

She is free to do whatever drastic measures..including bankruptcy..to continue to clear the path.

As the path gets clearer she will gain more and more sure footing, solvency, support, and joy.

And the people who believed she could do it, and the people who helped her along the way, will all feel the joy too.

 

And the people who have told her adult children that they better be prepared to support the artist for the rest of their lives shall be enlightened and shall be freed as well.

And the mother of the artist, who told the artist to get a real job so she could collect real unemployment benefits, will suddenly act as if she was the artist's biggest supporter all along.

The artist will finally get very good at what she's been attempting to do, and she'll finally achieve the level of artistry she always dreamed of, which could never have happened if she hadn't devoted her life 100% to her uncertain and difficult and controversial path.

But, you know, there have been starving artists and monks and poets and dreamers for centuries.

And other people have always had something to say about it until it all works out.

And I'm cool with that.

Thank you to those of you who read this.

Thank you to those of you who believe.

For those of you who read this and think anything less than, "wow this is such brave writing", don't come back, we don't need your kind of energy here.

Nay sayers, piss off.

We are going to change the world for the better with or without you.

If none of this resonates with you, go get yourself a real job and quit sitting around on the internet reading people's blogs.

 

 

3 comments

  • Davey O.
    Davey O. Buffalo, NY.
    Bravo!!!! I love this. Thank you for writing this. I had to deal with this from my parents when I was younger and informed them that I was going to attend college for music, instead of architectural drafting as was originally planned, and they pretty much lost their shit. They couldn't understand why I was going to spend two years of my life studying an art form that in their minds, very few made a living at. Making a living in music for them, as well as many people I have worked regular jobs with in my life, has always been equated with being famous. And I understand why they didn't understand my choice because as children who were raised during the Great Depression, their entire mindset was "get a job, get married, buy a house, have children, retire, and die." I never understood why someone would want to wait until they were 65 to begin living. But after I graduated from college and started having little bits of success here and there, all of sudden they became proud of what I was doing. They still didn't understand how someone could do something that had so much uncertainty to it, but these days, who can really say that any job is safe? Over the last 20 years or so, other than doctors, and lawyers, who puts in 25 or 30 years at one factory or service job and retires from it? How many people who are laid off from a "real job" right now have a skill that they can stream online during this crisis and earn a little extra income from? The answer to both of those questions is "people in the arts".

    Bravo!!!! I love this. Thank you for writing this. I had to deal with this from my parents when I was younger and informed them that I was going to attend college for music, instead of architectural drafting as was originally planned, and they pretty much lost their shit. They couldn't understand why I was going to spend two years of my life studying an art form that in their minds, very few made a living at. Making a living in music for them, as well as many people I have worked regular jobs with in my life, has always been equated with being famous. And I understand why they didn't understand my choice because as children who were raised during the Great Depression, their entire mindset was "get a job, get married, buy a house, have children, retire, and die." I never understood why someone would want to wait until they were 65 to begin living. But after I graduated from college and started having little bits of success here and there, all of sudden they became proud of what I was doing. They still didn't understand how someone could do something that had so much uncertainty to it, but these days, who can really say that any job is safe? Over the last 20 years or so, other than doctors, and lawyers, who puts in 25 or 30 years at one factory or service job and retires from it? How many people who are laid off from a "real job" right now have a skill that they can stream online during this crisis and earn a little extra income from? The answer to both of those questions is "people in the arts".

  • Mark
    Mark St. Paul
    Whats wrong with having a job? Probably a good idea for you actually.

    Whats wrong with having a job? Probably a good idea for you actually.

  • Courtney Yasmineh
    Courtney Yasmineh
    Thanks for the comments. Mark, my idea was that when I have had full time jobs I haven't worked as hard at my favorite "job" and thus didn't get it as far along the path as I wanted it to go in terms of commercial success. If I need the money and I don't make it any other way, I'm forcing myself to get better at my number one choice of "job". That has been my idea. It still is my idea.

    Thanks for the comments. Mark, my idea was that when I have had full time jobs I haven't worked as hard at my favorite "job" and thus didn't get it as far along the path as I wanted it to go in terms of commercial success. If I need the money and I don't make it any other way, I'm forcing myself to get better at my number one choice of "job". That has been my idea. It still is my idea.

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